Skip to content

Walking in Budapest

July 12, 2009

IMG_6608
I might have mentioned that one of steady treats of our travels is a walk. We like to search for the untouristy, somewhat more genuine heartbeat of the place, so we tend to walk around exploring. Barefoot anthropology, of a sort. But this is not what I’m talking about.

I know Razman doesn't like theese but the tram was a real feet saver. And a feast for Tamara.

I know Razman doesn't like theese but the tram was a real feet saver. And a feast for Tamara.

It seems that in every place we go to, we are bound to have our “walk”, the unplanned long march up, down or around. This does not mean that we get lost (though that happened once in Udine). It normally it has to do with poor estimation of distances on the map (Istanbul), refusal to pay a minibus that miraculously converts into a cab (Syria), Lonely Planet errors (Homs, new bus station, not 5 min but 5 km from the old one!!) or provocative Lonely Planet comments (Nemrut Dag is NOT to be hiked from the last dolmus stop, neither up nor down, not even if you hold a passport of the hiking-crazy nation of Slovenia!!), following tips from magazines and blogs (Istanbul again), trusting locals (not even in New York). 

Hommage to Amsters@m.

Hommage to Amsters@m.

I only gave you one city for each and since the last one was only me (and my poor friend Floris), I guess I’m the one responsible for all the insane walking we did in the past.

Vernacular outdoor advertising - I have never seen so many of these in the streets.

Vernacular outdoor advertising - I have never seen so many of these in the streets.

The thing is, no matter how hard we try to prevent it or avoid it, “the walk” will always find us. It is out there, lurking, stalking, luring. Smiling. Or in this case, barricading.

1989 or 2009?

1989 or 2009?

Saturday afternoon I skipped the closing sessions of the conference to spend a delightfull afternoon with my girls, spoiling our taste buds in one of the city’s oldest and finest coffehouses on our way.

Remnants of the past, and a brave, glittering new era.

Remnants of the past, and a brave, glittering new era.

Only, we never got there. Hungarian government was busy celebrating the 20th anniversary of the end of communism and half of the city was in barricades with police and other security guys swarming the place. There were more policemen than Hungarians there to celebrate the event, or to demonstrate. I guess there were more foreign polititians speeding up and down the baricaded streets than locals paying hommage to 1989. At least Tamara enjoyed the show of sirens an flashing lights.

One of Tamara's nightmares.

One of Tamara's nightmares.

So we never got to the coffee and cake paradise, but after a long, unplanned detour, ended up again in Menza and had an early dinner instead. Now, if you are in need of some delicious food, Budapest has some great palces to offer. And Menza is definetly one of them.

Pork steak stuffed with feta & c.o. CC had chicken and sweet potatoes with honey&mustard sauce. Tamara had more than half of my potatoes.

Pork steak stuffed with feta & c.o. CC had chicken and sweet potatoes with honey&mustard sauce. Tamara had more than half of my potatoes.

It’s one of those chic, urban places serving what might be described as “international” food, though some traditional eats were sprinkled across the menue. Yummy. And not pricey.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: